Louise Kauffmann

Post-doc at LPNC/GIPSA-Lab
Louise Kauffmann is a post-doc student specialized in cognitive neuroscience and visual perception. She works under the supervision of Nathalie Guyader (Lecturer, GIPSA-Lab) who is an expert in eye-tracking and in the computational and statistical modelling of eye movements, and Carole Peyrin (CNRS researcher, LPNC) who is specialized in the neurocognitive modelling of visual recognition using behavioral measures and fMRI.

Age

30 years old

Laboratories

GIPSA-Lab/LPNC

Working speciality


cognitive neuroscience, visual perception

 

Hobbies out of work

travels, reading, sport

 What is your current research theme?
My current post-doc research project aims at using eye movements to indirectly and non-invasively assess a wide range of cognitive functions. Indeed, eye movements elicit a large network of brain areas known to be involved in many functions such as visual perception and recognition, attention, spatial orienting but also executive and motor functions. Eye movements therefore constitute reliable witnesses of neurocognitive functioning. Importantly, they can also be used to detect dysfunctions linked to various pathologies.

In this context, I am currently building a normative eye movement database, by recording eye movement in a large sample of healthy individuals, which could be used as a reference to detect and characterize dysfunctions in patients. We will also test a population of patients with Parkinson’s disease in order to assess whether eye movements in these patients can be used as early markers of the disease. Finally, we will also adapt our protocols to fMRI experiments, in order to find oculomotor markers of the response in specific brain areas.

In the long run, this database is designed to be made openly available to the scientific and medical communities and to be used for the neurobiological and computational modelling of oculomotor functioning, or as a tool for neurocognitive assessment in healthy individuals and in patients.

My current post-doc research project aims at using eye movements to indirectly and non-invasively assess a wide range of cognitive functions. Indeed, eye movements elicit a large network of brain areas known to be involved in many functions such as visual perception and recognition, attention, spatial orienting but also executive and motor functions. Eye movements therefore constitute reliable witnesses of neurocognitive functioning. Importantly, they can also be used to detect dysfunctions linked to various pathologies. In this context, I am currently building a normative eye movement database, by recording eye movement in a large sample of healthy individuals, which could be used as a reference to detect and characterize dysfunctions in patients. We will also test a population of patients with Parkinson’s disease in order to assess whether eye movements in these patients can be used as early markers of the disease. Finally, we will also adapt our protocols to fMRI experiments, in order to find oculomotor markers of the response in specific brain areas.

In the long run, this database is designed to be made openly available to the scientific and medical communities and to be used for the neurobiological and computational modelling of oculomotor functioning, or as a tool for neurocognitive assessment in healthy individuals and in patients.
What has led you to this research work?
Since my master, I have been working on visual perception. My past research projects mainly focused on the behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying visual recognition… this therefore naturally led me to eventually wonder about an essential component of visual perception: eye movements!
What has been your biggest challenge since you started?
One of the biggest challenge is to find enough participants for the eye movement database as I am planning to record eye movements of about 250 participants of different age ranges (from young adults to elderlies). A major difficulty is also to find funding for our fMRI experiments, which takes a lot of time…One of the biggest challenge is to find enough participants for the eye movement database as I am planning to record eye movements of about 250 participants of different age ranges (from young adults to elderlies). A major difficulty is also to find funding for our fMRI experiments, which takes a lot of time…
What does interdisciplinarity bring to your project?

This project consists in behavioral and fMRI experiments in healthy subjects as well as in clinical populations and involves multidisciplinary methods from psychophysics and signal processing to cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychology. In that sense, it will have many applications at the theoretical, methodological and clinical levels. From a personal point of view, it is also a great opportunity to learn and to work in collaboration with researchers from diverse research fields. And after the research, what is your passion?

And after the research, what are your main activities?

Beside research, I also do a bit of teaching in psychology which I really enjoy. And apart from work, I like to do sport, read or travel…



For more information, please contact: Louise Kauffmann : louise.kauffmann@grenoble-inp.fr



Published on June 27, 2019